Examination of Distinctness, Uniformity and Stablility and Analysis of Cultivars of Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) in Uruguay

  • Federico Boschi Instituto Nacional de Semillas. Camino Bertolotti y Ruta 8, km 29, Barros Blancos, Uruguay
Keywords: DUS tests, plant varieties, plant breeder’s rigths, software GAIA

Abstract

Tests of distinctness, uniformity and stability (DUS) following the guidelines of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) are one of the requirements for granting Plant Breeder’s Rigths. The National Seed Institute (INASE) is responsible for DUS testing in Uruguay. DUS tests Fragaria x ananassa Duch. (strawberry) were performed in Barros Blancos, Uruguay in 2009 and 2010, using the UPOV guidelines. INASE studied 13 varieties for Plant Breeder’s Rigths, and two public cultivars. The objective was to determinate whether these varieties were distinct, uniform, and stable, by performing varietal descriptions of the 15 cultivars and analyzing their phenotypic distance. All cultivars proposed for protection were distinct, uniform, and kept stable characteristics. Variety description was made for the 15 varieties under study. Phenotypic distances were analyzed by two methods: analysis using «Manhattan average» linkage and the GAIA software for DUS testing. The cultivars were divided in two groups according to phenotypic proximity. Cultivars in group I were obtained at the National Agricultural Research Institute (INIA) and Seascape. Those in group II were developed by the University of California. Yurí and INIAArazá varieties were the closest in proximity within the group I, and Albion and Portolas in group II.

Published
2021-02-10
How to Cite
1.
Boschi F. Examination of Distinctness, Uniformity and Stablility and Analysis of Cultivars of Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) in Uruguay. Agrociencia Uruguay [Internet]. 10Feb.2021 [cited 8Mar.2021];16(2):82-91. Available from: http://agrocienciauruguay.uy/ojs/index.php/agrociencia/article/view/543
Section
Plant production